Overnighting in a Hanok at Doo Guesthouse

In a traditional Korean style room made out of wood with wood paneling on the floor and white walls, I stand in a hanbok.  The waistline of the hanbok is just below my breasts, and below the waist is flowing hot pink.  The upper part is white.  A lavender sash ties the hanbok together at the waistline.  Above my hair I wear a little cap with flowers on it.

I had spent a few nights at a hostel in a hanok-inspired building, but that wasn’t quite the same thing as staying in a real. I figured staying in a real hanok is something I ought to do once, so I booked a night at Doo Guesthouse in Seoul’s Bukchon neighborhood.

Bukchon is in Seoul's Jongno district.

Bukchon is in Seoul’s Jongno district.

Included in the price (which is one of the lowest nightly rates for a hanok stay in Seoul) is the opportunity to wear a hanbok, the traditional dress of Joseon times.

DSCF8071

I picked out one I liked, put it on, and then one of the staff took photos of me wearing it at various spots within the guesthouse.

Considering how often buildings burned down in Joseon times, they probably wished they had fire extinguishers like the one in the lower right corner

Considering how often buildings burned down in Joseon times, they probably wished they had fire extinguishers like the one in the lower right corner

I don’t do this kind of thing very often when I travel, which probably makes it all the more fun when I do play dress up and pretend I am a young woman of the yangban class like Shin Saimdang in her nice hanok home.

I also think it's fun to manipulate images on the computer to throw off face-recognition software

I also think it’s fun to manipulate images on the computer to throw off face-recognition software

I got my own room (having spent lots of time in hostel dorms, I could really appreciate this), and I slept on an electric ondol. Considering how cold Seoul was becoming at that time of year (November), the warm ondol was really nice.

Accessories in the hanbok room

Accessories in the hanbok room

There are actually two guesthouse buildings, and three little courtyards among them.

DSCF8087

The same night I was there, there were three generations of a Taiwanese family on vacation together sharing one of the large rooms (or maybe they had multiple rooms, I don’t remember) across the courtyard from me.

DSCF8088

There was also a German man staying there that night. I had run into quite a few Germans during my trip in South Korea, such as my dormmate in Andong. I mentioned this to him. He replied that even though Germans before travel in South Korea, it’s still considered a strange place to go on vacation. He’s been to South Korea a few times, and when he tells people in Germany that he’s going to have a vacation in South Korea, most are puzzled and ask ‘South Korea?’

DSCF8089

All in all, Doo Guesthouse is a good place to stay. On top of being in a hanok in a historic neighborhood, it’s close to many tourist attractions such as Jongmyo and Gyeongbokgung, it’s also near Anguk subway station. If I weren’t trying to keep my expenses down, I would have happily chosen to spend all of my nights in Seoul at Doo Guesthouse.

DSCF8090

Advertisements

About Sara K.

Sara K. is an aromantic asexual from California who has previously lived in Taiwan. She blogs at the notes which do not fit, has previously been a contributor at Manga Bookshelf, and has written guest posts for Hacking Chinese. She enjoys reading, travel, live theatre, learning languages, and gardening.
This entry was posted in Hanok/Folk Village, Joseon, Seoul and tagged , , , , , . Bookmark the permalink.

4 Responses to Overnighting in a Hanok at Doo Guesthouse

  1. Pingback: A Final Afternoon in South Korea: The Meeting, the Guesthouse, the Airport | S.K. in S.K.

  2. Pingback: SK in SK: Chronological Order | S.K. in S.K.

  3. Pingback: SK in SK: A History of South Korea | S.K. in S.K.

  4. Pingback: SK in SK: The Landscape of Feelings | S.K. in S.K.

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s